uk government to consider society lottery reform

uk government to consider society lottery reform

by 29.06.2018 0 comments

Society Lotteries could be set for major reform, as the UK government embarks upon a consultation period relating to the amount of money that can be raised for good causes.

Running for a period of ten weeks, and open to members of the public, a series of rises are to be considered, with the previous sales limit increase occurring in 2009.

Government recommendations would see the maximum draw prize rise from its current limit of £400,000 to £500,000, whilst also asking for views on increasing the number of tickets society lotteries can sell to a value of £100m per year, in addition to the amount they can raise per draw to £5m.

Regarding the consultation period, the government states that “Society lotteries play a vital part of the giving landscape by enabling charities and other societies, such as sports clubs, to run lotteries for good causes. The amount a society can raise is subject to limits of £4m sales per draw, £10m sales per year and a maximum prize of £400,000.

“Our preferred options would allow a tenfold increase in the amount that a large society lottery can raise per year, bringing the annual limit to £100m. The per draw sales limit would rise to £5m and the maximum prize to £500,000.”

Tracey Crouch, Minister for Sport and Civil Society, said: “Society lotteries make a vital difference to communities up and down the country. They raise hundreds of millions of pounds every year, supporting our veterans, lifeboats, hospices, air ambulances and many other great causes.

“They are an important fundraising tool for charities and we want to ensure that both society lotteries and the National Lottery are able to thrive now and in the future.”

Society lotteries, such as those run by charities The Health Lottery and People’s Postcode Lottery, raised over £255 million for good causes in 2016/17.

The move would allow charities and community groups to increase fundraising methods through society lotteries, while protecting the National Lottery’s ability to raise money for good causes.

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